Ninth Grade - Mathematics

 

Activities


The Savings Search

Financial and Economic Concepts: Banking & financial services

Ninth Grade – CCSS Mathematics I , Linear, Quadratic, & Exponential Models.
Construct and compare linear, quadratics, and exponential models and solve problems.

2. Construct linear and exponential functions, including arithmetic and geometric sequences, given a graph, a description of a relationship, or two input-output pairs (include reading these from a table.)

The purpose of this activity is to help students understand the difference between simple and compound interest. Provide the students with the following scenarios and have them determine how they would invest their money based on what they learned about CDs, checking accounts, savings accounts, and money market accounts. Indicate that they must decide how to invest and be able to explain why they made their decision. Provide all the scenarios to each student or group of students.

Review each scenario and have each student or group report the option they chose and why they chose it. Compare and discuss the different responses. Discuss how the amount of money, length of investment, rate of return, and access to the funds might affect their investment choice.

Based on the investment choice, have the students calculate the interest gained on their account over 10 years using the information they gathered from their assigned financial institution.

Finish the lesson by reviewing the different types of interest and accounts, emphasizing the importance of understanding the various ways to save and invest money.

Complete Lesson Plan Complete Lesson Plan

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Spending Plan Shake Up

Financial and Economic Concepts: Basic Budgeting

Ninth Grade – Personal Finance

Standard 3: Students will understand principles of money management.

Objective 1: Describe the role of planning and maintaining a balanced budget.

This interactive activity is a student favorite.  It is great for introducing budgeting concepts.  Students will use dried beans as manipulatives that represent MONEY!  After navigating through a budgeting game board with one of the bean games (two game variations available), students complete a real budget, calculating percentages and category totals.  Direct students to use figures for a 9th grade male/female, who just got his/her first job working 15 hours/week for $8.25/hour.

Complete Lesson Plan FEFE Spending Plan Game (pdf) (see pages 7 & 9)

USU Extension Bean Game (pdf)

Student Worksheets (See My Own Budget and Spending Plan)

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Points on Buying a Home

Financial and Economic Concepts: Basic Budgeting

CCSS Mathematics, Mathematics 1 (Grade 9)

Linear - Quadratic Exponential Model.         

1. Distinguish between situations that can be modeled with linear functions and exponential functions.

For this activity, students consider financing differences when buying a house. Students learn about paying points and interest rate.

Complete Lesson Plan Complete Lesson Plan (When accessing this lesson you may be prompted to sign in. Simply select your town and enter your zip code and area code.)

Points on Buying a House Worksheet Points on Buying a House Worksheet (pdf)

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Interest is Interesting

Financial and Economic Concept: Saving and financial investing

CCSS Mathematics, Mathematics 1 (Grade 9)

Linear - Quadratic Exponential Model.         

1. Distinguish between situations that can be modeled with linear functions and exponential functions.

Simple and compound interest, the rule of 72

Assignment: Computing interest and using the rule of 72

Complete Lesson Plan Complete Lesson Plan (pdf)

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A Penny Saved - Comic Book

Financial and Economic Concept: Savings and Financial Investments

CCSS Mathematics, Mathematics 1 (Grade 9)

Linear - Quadratic Exponential Model.         

1. Distinguish between situations that can be modeled with linear functions and exponential functions.

A Penny Saved is a comic book available as a PDF or to read online.  Either print it for students, provide computer access to read online, or project it so the class can read it together.

Hand out A Penny Saved: Student Worksheet. Tell students to read pages 2–11 and answer the questions as they read. (The approximate time to complete this activity is 30 minutes.)

A Penny Saved: Student Worksheet A Penny Saved: Student Worksheet (pdf)

A Penny Saved: Student Worksheet - Answer Key A Penny Saved: Student Worksheet - Answer Key (pdf)

Review A Penny Saved: Student Worksheet with the students, using A Penny Saved: Answer Sheet. Discuss selected questions and provide clarification of concepts when necessary. Have students discuss and compare the things they wanted and listed with the things the characters in the comic wanted on pages 2–5 of the comic book (a diamond, a wedding, college, sneakers, travel, a house). Ask students to give examples of the possible consequences of not saving. (Answers should include having no protection for emergencies or unforeseen problems and having no reserve amount for special occasions).

Review key vocabulary words. Have students write the terms on their worksheets or on a separate sheet of paper.

Refer students to A Penny Saved, page 7, box 4, and have them read what the characters say about earning interest. Tell students that they will soon learn more about the computation of interest, but for now they should look at A Penny Saved, page 8, which illustrates the growth of an account with simple versus compound interest. Refer to the charts and point out the difference in amounts earned between the two types of interest.

Point out to students that there is a quick method of calculating how fast savings grow with compound interest. A Penny Saved, page 8, box 3, explains the Rule of 72. The Rule of 72 tells how many years it will take for savings to double with compound interest. Explain to students that if they divide the interest rate into 72, the answer is approximately the number of years it will take savings to double with compound interest. For example, with a 9 percent compound interest rate, savings will double in approximately 8 years (72/9 = 8). With a 3 percent compound interest rate, savings will double in approximately 24 years (72/3 = 24).

Complete Lesson Plan Complete Lesson Plan (pdf)

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